Saturday, 22 November 2008

Seven Random or Weird Things About Myself

I've been tagged for this twice, by Elijah Lineberry and Peter Cresswell. Here goes:

  1. I once lived in a suburb of Tauranga called Bethlehem. Nice place, but not quite as ancient as its namesake (understandably).
  2. I have two middle names, as I am named after a great uncle who was killed in the first world war.
  3. I once received an email with an invitation attached to attend a UN Woman's Conference in Manila. The topic was "Gender and Climate Change."
  4. My dad has spoken to former US President Jimmy Carter. He said "hello, Mr President" when Jimmy Carter was visiting Rotorua, and received a reply of "hello".
  5. I was a big believer in man-made global warming back in primary school -I even declared to my dad once that "I don't like industry" back when I was about seven. Luckily, I know better now! I also used to believe in God, even though my parents have always been Atheists.
  6. I have spoken personally to the Auditor-General about Bernard Darnton's court case over Helen Clark's pledge cards, in 2006.
  7. I have an uncle who likes Immanuel Kant.
The rules are:
1. Link to the person who tagged you
2. Post the rules
3. Share seven random or weird facts about yourself
4. Tag 7 random people at the end of the post with their links.
I tag:

Phil
Luke
Lindsay Mitchell
Marcus Bachler
Mark Thiele
Gman
Trevor Loudon

6 comments:

hanso said...

"I have spoken personally to the Auditor-General about Bernard Darnton's court case over Helen Clark's pledge cards, in 2006."

I would be much obliged to you if you eleborate with this story...

PS: I never realy understood Rand's disgust with Kant. He was wet rationalist, sure, but harly as bad as, say, Plato. Could you help me with this?

hanso said...

Sorry. That's "hardly".

Callum said...

hanso, I spoke to the Auditor-General late in August, 2006 at an event called "Kids Conference" in the early days of the court case, and I asked him about his findings. As it was early on in the case he said that there'd been no substantial evidence thus far, but he was still looking into it. Obviously, he did find evidence of illegally used money.

On Kant, his idea of morality is that moral actions are performed out of duty to "moral law", and that self-interested actions are evil. That's my relatively limited knowledge of Kant.

Luke H said...

Here we go ...

hanso said...

Thank you.

PC said...

Frankly, I'd keep quiet about the uncle. ;^)